HOW DID IT COME TO THIS ? SWEET ANGEL BY 'ANGEL'

GHOST IN THE MACHINE 'SWEET BAND OF ANGELS'

story of angel    background to cd

 

Basically the group developed from 'the pebbles' who did everything but get a hit record in the early seventies. They always knew Sweet first on the university circuit as Wainwrights Gentlemen in 1967 and later off and on meeting at gigs. The last time they crossed paths was in 1970 in Jersey where Brian Conneley, Steve Priest and Mick Tucker were members before Andy Scott joined.

When the Glam Boom hit the music business members of 'the pebbles' saw them at gigs but always said a friendly hallo. The Pebbles came to an end in late part of 1973 when a record deal with Mickey Most and Rak Records fell through. They were to record A Touch Too Much by Chinn and Chapman but it went instead to Arrows who made a hit record of it.

Martin Kemp the last bass player of Pebbles got a phone call from Mick Tucker early 1974 asking if the Pebbles would record Good Time Fanny a song Andy Scott had written. Although they had gone their own way they agreed and rehearsed the song with a Who like middle finishing the recording at Advision with Mick Tucker and Andy Scott producing Pete Coleman engineering (the sweet engineer). The lads recorded Who Do Ya Think Your Fooling their own song as the 'b' side. On May 24th 1974 it was released on Cube (fly) records and Polydor in Europe. Although there was a lot of promotion in the uk it failed to chart. In Germany and elsewhere it was another story and quickly charted which led to more promotion and a German tour. Angel also got the accolade of being voted best newcomer behind Queen in the German Bravo magazine.

All went well but bad luck became the norm for the group. First Joe Ryan left disliking the music. He was replaced by Mick Johnson for two weeks but he hated touring. By luck Bob Banasiak met the lads in a Southend on Sea music shop from a local band Fancy, he was a great bluesy player and added much to the Angel sound. Another single Little Boy Blue a almost punk like record before it's time written by Andy Scott was recorded at Essex Studios London. This did less well but had a strong self written rock track on the 'b' side Tragedy Queen which showed musical progress.

Soon after Martin Kemp wanted to return to double glazing which left Bob and the lead vocalist Brian Johnson in the lurch. Steve Rickard felt very depressed by the whole project so the two survivors tried to revive interest first visiting Sweet at a gig and then pressing Utopia management for a new record. Brian found a song called Heart Of The Matter which was very apt and Andy Scott thought could be a hit with a Sixteens type of arrangement. Andy and Mick Tucker flew to Jersey where the boys were playing to record the song there. They found the only studio closed  even Brian Conneley came to help, the only outcome was a pleasant meal together.

On the return to England a call from the new boss at Cube Records a new manager tried to get things moving in 1975. Recordings of Hold Me, Vote For Rockand Rolland Angel Eyes both written by Bob and Brian couldn't get releases although Polydor wanted them in Germany. Due to management problems they couldn't get a band release from the contracts. After a few good concerts with a new strong line-up including Kevin from Doctor Feelgood and keyboard player Simon they called it a day. Brian even tried to get the Tremeloes Alan Blakley interested with self penned Feet of Clay but to no avail this also failed to get a Angel release.

Brian Johnson went on to Octopus in Belgium and scored 5 hits Bob Banasiak joined Love Affair and now lives in the States.

30 years later all 5 original lads did a successful re-union gig with video intro by Andy Scott. The rest is musical history.

Recently the band in 2008 reformed a new line up and started work on new cd releases recorded in belgium and england. They have played in both germany and belgium where their pop rock sound is admired

the cd 'the butterfly song' was released in 2010

 

 

 

old photos of 'angel'

 

publicity shot

last concert shot of 'angel'